The Effelsberg Radio Telescope
The 100-m Effelsberg Telescope
The 100-m Effelsberg Telescope

Since its inauguration in 1972, the Effelsberg 100-metre Radio Telescope has been Europe's largest, and the world's second-largest, fully steerable telescope. It operates at wavelengths from about 90 cm to 7 mm (frequencies of 0.395 to 95.5 GHz). The telescope is operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie in Bonn, Germany (part of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft). The Effelsberg Telescope was involved in several surveys; one example is the all-sky continuum survey at 408 MHz (73 cm) by Haslam et al. (1981, 1982; Astron. and Astrophys.).

The telescope uses a digital filterbank and a ROACH-based system to perform pulsar observations with very high bandwidth. This, along with its high sensitivity and low system noise in several observing bands, makes the Effelsberg Telescope a particularly powerful instrument for high-precision pulsar timing. For more information, including technical details, please visit the Effelsberg Radio Telescope website.